an Investment Perspective on a Home

an Investment Perspective on a Home

Looking for an investment that will turn $10,000 into $80,000 in seven years?  Sound too good to be true?  What if I told you that you could live in it every day during that seven years?  Would that sound even better?

A $300,000 home purchased today on an FHA loan would have a $10,500 down payment.  If it appreciated at 2% annually, which is less than  the U.S. average, the future value of the home would be $344,606 in seven years.  The unpaid balance on the loan would be $256,350 based on normal amortization which would make the equity in the home $88,256.

The annual compound rate of return on the down payment would be 35%.  This number sounds so large, that you might start doubting the credibility of this example.

Looking at some alternative investments, a ten-year Treasury note is currently paying 1.73%.  You can earn 2.1% on a ten-year certificate of deposit.  If you could handle the volatility of the stock market and pick the right stock, you might earn 7-10%.

There really is no alternative investment that can earn the return that an owner-occupied home can offer while giving you the ability to live and enjoy the home during the holding period.

Even if you could find an investment that paid a good return, when you realize the gain, you’ll be required to pay income tax, either at long-term capital gains rates or ordinary income.  However, a person who has lived in a home for at least two of the last five years can exclude up to $250,000 of gain from their income if they are single and up to $500,000 of gain if the owners are married, filing jointly.

A home can certainly be a place of your own to feel safe and secure, to raise your family, share with friends and build memories.  A home could be considered an emotional investment and one that pays big dividends.  A home is also a financial investment not just for the reasons mentioned above but also because the equity can be accessed by doing a cash-out refinance or a home equity line of credit.

See what your investment might look like by using the Rent vs. Own and giving us a call at (707) 467-3693.

Understanding the Mortgage Interest Deduction

Understanding the Mortgage Interest Deduction

Mortgage interest paid on your principal residence is deductible today as it was in 1913 when 16th amendment allowed personal income tax.  The 2017 Tax Cut and Jobs Act reduced the maximum amount of acquisition debt from $1,000,000 to $750,000.

Acquisition debt is the amount of debt used to buy, build or improve a principal residence, up to the maximum amount.  A common misunderstanding among taxpayers is that you are entitled to that much debt even if you refinance a home during your ownership years.

Acquisition debt is a dynamic number that changes over time.  It decreases with normal amortization as the principal amount of debt is reduced.  The only way to increase acquisition debt after a home is purchased is to borrow additional funds that are used for capital improvements.

Assume a person buys a home with a new mortgage and after the home has enjoyed significant appreciation, refinances the home for much more than is currently owed.  Let’s also say that the refinance amount is less than $750,000 which might lead the borrower to an erroneous conclusion that all the interest will be deductible.

The current acquisition debt is transferred to the new mortgage.  Only the portion of the funds used to pay for new capital improvements can be combined to equal the increased acquisition debt.  The interest on that part of the mortgage is deductible as qualified mortgage interest.

The remainder of the refinanced mortgage is attributed to personal debt and the interest paid on that is not deductible.

Lenders are not generally concerned with making a homeowner a fully tax-deductible loan.  Lenders are interested in making a loan which will make a profit and be repaid according to the terms.  The annual statements that most lenders issue to borrowers indicate how much interest was paid in a calendar year as they are required to do by federal law.

Part of the confusion may be because homeowners believe they can deduct interest on debt up to $750,000 and this annual statement shows the interest paid for the year.  It is up to each homeowner to keep track of their acquisition debt and only deduct the qualified mortgage interest.

Your tax professional can be very helpful in determining this amount.  It is important to notify them that you have refinanced a home during the tax year for which the taxes are being reported.  For more information, see IRS Publication 936 and Homeowners Tax Guide.  Home equity debt has not been allowed since the beginning of 2018.